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RAF MARHAM HERITAGE CENTRE

RAF MARHAM HERITAGE CENTRE OPENING TIMES

LAST SATURDAY OF EACH MONTH
9.30 am - 4:00 pm

FOR BOOKINGS OF PARTIES IN EXCESS OF 10 OR OUTSIDE OF NORMAL OPENING HOURS

PLEASE CONTACT:
RAF MARHAM AVIATION HERITAGE CENTRE BOOKINGS CLERK ON 07717 426 961

PLEASE NOTE THAT BOOKINGS OUTSIDE OF NORMAL OPENING TIMES ARE DEPENDANT ON OPERATIONAL COMMITMENTS. 

 
 

The RAF Marham Heritage Centre, in a former church next to the West Norfolk base’s main gate, was officially opened on Friday 27 April 2013. Its curator, Warrant Officer Steve Roberts, said: “We started this probably about four years ago, trying to bring life to an old project that was the station history room. “We saw it as our responsibility to bring this to life as one of the last main operating bases in East Anglia for the Royal Air Force. “We have a massive responsibility to keep this alive for the future. It’s only by keeping our heritage alive that we can shape the future.”

WO Roberts said the centre, which would have a garden of remembrance alongside it, would provide a fitting tribute to all ex and serving members of the RAF who had been based at Marham. “Some people have left here to go on operations and not come home,” he added. The centre will also contain an interactive learning facility, which has been created by archiving more than 15,000 photographs and documents.

WO Roberts said the centre would be open to the public on the last Saturday of each month. Admission will be free.

“It’s something the station can be proud of; something the community can be proud of,” he said. “It will be unique to Marham.” Displays will cover the different eras at Marham, through the second world war, the Cold War, the Falklands, Gulf wars and, most recently, the Libyan conflict. Its long flying history can be traced back to 1916, when Marham opened as a satellite base to a flying station at nearby Narborough. Its first job was defending Norfolk from raids by German Zeppelin airships.

After being mothballed between the wars, Marham re-opened as the RAF began expanding in 1937. By the time war broke out, in 1939, it was home to a fleet of Wellington bombers, which flew on some of the first raids of the war. Twin-engined Mosquitos and Stirling heavy bombers were also based at Marham during the war. Through the 1950s and 60s, it was home to a succession of flying tanker units, as the RAF pioneered air-to-air refuelling. During the Falklands conflict, a Vulcan bomber was refuelled in-flight on its way to bomb Port Stanley airfield, to deny it to the Argentines. Three decades later, in March 2011, Tornado jets flew direct from Marham to attack Col Gadaffi’s air defences, as the Libyan conflict flared.

In April 2013, one of the most significant events in the station’s long history occurred when defence secretary Philip Hammond flew to Norfolk to announce it would be home to the next generation of fast jets – meaning its future would be secure until 2040.


RAF Marham Heritage Centre

RAF Marham Heritage Centre